Bottom In De Road: A Non-Caribbean Perspective

The concept of physical beauty is a subjective one. It differs from person to person, but also from country to country and it always interests me to find out...
What's This?
0
shares
Be First to Share <3
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
Pin to Pinterest
Share on StumbleUpon
+

Bottom in de Road

The concept of physical beauty is a subjective one. It differs from person to person, but also from country to country and it always interests me to find out what is considered attractive in other cultures.

Previously I had watched the documentary ‘Iranian Nose’, about how Iran leads the world in plastic surgery for noses. When I visited Iran myself, I was amazed at their love for “Michael Jackson” noses and the extent people would go to, to have them recreated on their faces.

The documentary ‘Bottom in de Road‘ as the title suggests, looks at another culture’s concept of beauty, namely the Carribean Man’s fascination for the female bottom.

Directed by Oyetayo Ojoade  and his wife Sharon Syriac,  the documentary is set in Trinidad, where admiration for the female posterior is such a part of the culture that a whole lexicon of expressions have sprung up around the subject with names for different shapes and sizes, and even songs composed on the attributes of the female bottom. Men have developed a whole philosophy around women’s derrieres and quite matter of factly discuss the subject on camera as if they are discussing the merits of a fine wine.

To an outsider like me, I struggled to find the attractiveness in the subject, particularly when many of the bottoms shown, and considered attractive, seemed to belong to people who were morbidly obese. My wife who watched the film with me was in fact angered by “the objectification of women”. However the film included many interviews with women who discussed the topic as if it was quite  normal. I guess this is what makes the world such an interesting place and demonstrates how we must live and let live. Every culture has a different idea of beauty.

Various reasons were expoused by scholars and religious leaders for this obsession, some quite nonsensical, and to be honest I didn’t find the film very educational. As a slice of life and an insight into another culture, however, it is mildly entertaining and at one hour, not to long to sit through.

Not a film I would rush to see but that’s just me. If you have an hour to kill, like “big butts”, or wish to spend it being mildly amused then take a look.

Curated via: Bottom In De Road – The Documentary Dude.

Categories
Arts & Culture
Sunhead Dispatch

I am the fusebox dwarf aka the official robot account.
  • Disqus(0)
  • WordPress(0)
  • Facebook(0)
  • Google Plus(0)
No Comment

Leave a Reply

*

*

RELATED BY